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1:18 Alpine A110 1800S #1, Tour de Corse, 1973

The Alpine A110, nicknamed the Berlinette, represented the quintessence of what a rally car should be. It symbolised the Alpine brand, to such a degree that it inspired a renaissance of the brand in 2017. during the Tour de Corse of 1973, the Number 1 was placed in the hands of Jean-Pierre Nicolas, who flew through the race. Heading up the first stage, it ended up at the top of the podium, along with two other Alpine models. At the end of the season the brand was granted the title of World Rally champion.   Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
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1:18 BMW M3 Sport Evo (1990)

Regardless of the E30 gaining cult status, this version is one of the must-haves for collectors of the brand. Produced solely between the months of December 1989 and March 1990 to the tune of 600 units, it was equipped with unique elements designed solely for the car. With adjustable front and rear shields, thinned glazing and a smaller reservoir, it dropped below the 1200 kg mark and had optimal performance ratios. The aerodynamics were completely reviewed alongside. This Sport Evo version is distinctive due to its decorative band on the bumpers.     Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
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1:18 BMW M3, red, 1986

The BMW M3 was born from the desire of the Bavarian manufacturer to have a licensed FIA Group A competition car. To accredit its competition model, BMW was under the obligation of commercialising 5000 units minimum of a civilian version. Revealed in Frankfurt in 1985, its production began the following Spring. It received specific shields, widened wings, a rear spoiler and a redesigned rear windscreen so as to obtain an air penetration coefficient of 0.33. This first M3 would end up becoming a legend, symbolising the prestige of the brand.     Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
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1:18 Citroën Acadiane Michelin, 1984

The professionnal version of the famous 2CV saw the light of day in 1978. It was equipped with a bicylinder boxer engine of 602 cm3 pushing 35 horsepower, capable of bringing this utility vehicle to a top speed of 102 km/h. This popular small truck proved an instant success within all lines of work, as craftsmen, salesmen and postal services used it. When its successor came out in 1984, the C15 did not stop it from remaining in the Citroën catalogue until 1987, taking with an archetypal image of France.     Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
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1:18 Citroën Acadine "Post" (1984)

The professionnal version of the famous 2CV saw the light of day in 1978. It was equipped with a bicylinder boxer engine of 602 cm3 pushing 35 horsepower, capable of bringing this utility vehicle to a top speed of 102 km/h. This popular small truck proved an instant success within all lines of work, as craftsmen, salesmen and postal services used it. When its successor came out in 1984, the C15 did not stop it from remaining in the Citroën catalogue until 1987, taking with an archetypal image of France.     Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
incl. VAT plus P&P

1:18 Citroen Dyane, blue, 1967

In the middle of the sixties, sales for the Citroën 2CV were starting to feel the burn from its rival, the Renault R4. The brand decided to react by producing a profound evolution of the car. The Dyane’s name found its inspiration through the catalogue of names available with Panhard, recently purchased by the car manufacturer. Similarly to its rival, the Dyane was a hatchback, equipped with modern projectors integrated into the wings with a bi-cylinder engine derived from the model used for the other cars in the brand. Destined to replace the 2CV, the Dyane left the market before it, with its commercialisation being terminated in 1983.     Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
incl. VAT plus P&P

1:18 Citroën Traction IICV, black, 1937

When it came out in 1934, the Citroën Traction was a revolution. With front-wheel drive, its mono-shelled structure, hydraulic breaks, and its independent wheels, it surprised everyone and made the competition look ridiculous. Its reputation stemmed from exceptional handling on the road and luxurious comfort. This large sedan would make French history by first being the car of the Gestapo before becoming the icon of the Resistance.     Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
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1:18 Fiat 500 L, pink, 1969

The Fiat 500 F was first introduced to the public at the Geneva Car show of 1965. It was a major innovation for the Italian brand, with the small Cinquecento being equipped with doors that opened against the wind, a widened windscreen a redesigned interior. Meanwhile, its engine gained a half horsepower bringing it to a total of 18. The F’s success would end up convincing Fiat of the need to prolong the career of the 500 model. With new chromes, improved door handles, new counters and a multitude of other modifications, it opened the path for more substantial versions of the Italian car.     Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
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1:18 Porsche 911 Carrera 2.8 RSR "Le Grand Bazar", 1973

Placed in the Auto Tour of 1973, this Porsche 911 is unique. Its decoration served as a promotion of the last film of Claude Zidi, The Big Store. The car was decorated with a specific look based around the name of the film and its characters, the Charlots. The technical specifications of the car were not to be taken lightly either with this RSR version. The 2,7L Porsche engine producing 210 horsepower, with a total weight of 975 kg, its wings were widened, the front spoiler was one-of-a-kind and this version was equipped with the famous ‘Duck tail’ wing.     Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
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1:18 Porsche 911 RSR Sunocco - 24H Daytona, 1973

Having decided to run the mythical 24 Hours of Daytona, Penske Racing from Reading, Pennsylvania, was given a Porsche Carrera straight from the factory floor. Modified by the Americans, its 2.8L engine saw its output jump to 310 hp. Its suspension was modified based on known issues with the track, and the brakes were borrowed from the Porsche 917. The team to drive this car was made up of Mark Donohue and George Follmer, who quickly reached pole position. A blown valve however forced them to declare forfeit even as they were winning the race.     Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
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1:18 Porsche 911 SC GR4 Rallye D´Armor, 1979

The Porsche 911 has had a remarkable career rocketing round the various circuits the world has to offer, as well as enjoying a large number of rally races. Bernard Beguin chose this particular Porsche in 1979 for the French Rally Championship. Alongside his copilot Jean-Jacques Lenne, he took home several rounds of which the Rally d’Armor, and finally raked in the gold for the FRC. Like all 911s, the SC version was pushed forward with a 6 cylinder flat engine, and was equipped with widened Carrera wings.     Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
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1:18 Subaru Impreza #5, Rallye Monte Carlo, 1995

The Subaru Impreza was part of the legends of global rallying. The Japanese manufacturer, a specialist in integral transmissions quickly saw the benefits of pushing this competition-grade technology. The Impreza ruled supreme over the WRC. With its midnight blue livery and gilded rims, its numerous wins would make the small Japanese firm a big catch. In 1995, the number 5 was placed in the hands of Spanish champion Carlos Sainz who made first place in the Monte Carlo rally.     Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
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1:18 VW Beetle 1303 SCCA Rallye, 1980

So as to capture the heart of America, the Beetle became a star-studded celebrity of cinema as well as a racing car. This particular orange car took part in the 24 Hours of Mexico several times, as well as the Pro Rally Series of the Sports Car Club of America. It participated in these races until the beginning of the Eighties, notably in the Rally America, before being put back in the garage by its driver Al Schmit. When the latter died, his family sold the car that was then completely resorted. In honour of its rebirth it featured on the cover the celebrated Hot VW Magazine.     Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
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1:18 AC Corba 427 MK II, orange/black, 1965

Caroll Shelby was a Texan pilot who was forced to stop his career in 1960 at the age of 37, due to health concerns. Thus began a dream of his to produce the ultimate American sports car, capable of competing with the likes of Ferrari and Porsche. First, the chassis, that he found with the English manufacturer AC Bristol. Associated to a Ford V8, the car quickly became a winner. Facing off against the much heavier Corvettes, the light Cobra raced through the American states in its quest for glory. The 427 was launched in 1965 with a redesigned chassis, widened tires, buffed up wings, and a 427 inch cube engine – 7 liters – for an amazing horsepower of 410.     Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
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1:18 Citoen HY (1969)

  Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
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1:18 Citroen 2 CV 6, Coca Cola, 1978

  Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
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1:18 Citroën 2CV6 "007", yellow, 1981

In 1981, for the twelfth film in the James Bond franchise, Citroën jumped at the opportunity to plug their famous 2CV. Four special cars were used for the film. This series was based on the 2CV6, inheriting square front lights and disk brakes, and coloured a Helios yellow. 1000 cars were produced, 500 of which were for France, the other 500 for the English market. To increase sales, Citroën added a sachet of adhesives in the form of bullet holes so that the owners could make their car unique.     Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
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1:18 Citroën 2CV6 BZH, white/black, 1978

Icone of the French automobile, this miniature is an original model Solido. The decoration is the fruit of our imagination : it takes again the elements of the regional flag of French Brittany, region with Celtic roots and where Solido's offices are now located.   Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
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1:18 Citroën 2CV6 Dolly, grey-red, 1985

The 2CV Dolly was a limited series of the French auto-mobile icon. The Dolly had the specificity of being produced in seven different versions, manufactured through three different series consecutively. This Vallelunga Red/Cormorant Grey version came on the 21st March 1985. Based on the 2CV6 Special, it shared its counterpart’s round headlights, grey tissue seats with diamond-shaped motifs and chrome hubcaps. It was adorned with the inscription of “Dolly” at the base of the windscreen and on the trunk of the car. Its livery was enhanced with lateral bands.     Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
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1:18 Citroën Acadiane, beige, 1984

The direct descendant of the 2CV Fourgonnette saw the light of day at the end of 1977, in the Spanish factory of Vigo. Its bicylinder boxer engine of 602 cm3 had 35 horsepower in its later version, with the engine having been borrowed from the Ami 8. This allowed the little utility car to reach 102 km/h, all the while ensuring France's logistics and transport of merchandise. The Acadiane was produced to the tune of 253 313 units, resisting nearly four years after the arrival of its replacement, the Citroën C15.     Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
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1:18 Citroën Acadiane, blue, 1984

The direct descendant of the 2CV Fourgonnette saw the light of day at the end of 1977, in the Spanish factory of Vigo. Its bicylinder boxer engine of 602 cm3 had 35 horsepower in its later version, with the engine having been borrowed from the Ami 8. This allowed the little utility car to reach 102 km/h, all the while ensuring France's logistics and transport of merchandise. The Acadiane was produced to the tune of 253 313 units, resisting nearly four years after the arrival of its replacement, the Citroën C15.     Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
incl. VAT plus P&P

1:18 Citroën DS Special, red, 1972

When it appeared at the Paris show of 1955, the Citroën DS had the effect of a bombshell. Developed under the code name VGD (Véhicule de Grande Diffusion, Large Circulation Vehicle), it brought to the market original ideas such as its hydropneumatics suspension. A simplified version was presented following a push by Pierre Bercot, head of the company. It would be called ID in order to differentiate itself from the DS. In 1970 the ID became the special D, and let the great Citroën roll through the decades and become a legend of the industry.     Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
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1:18 Citroen Dyane 6 (1967) jade green

In the middle of the sixties, sales for the Citroën 2CV were starting to feel the burn from its rival, the Renault R4. The brand decided to react by producing a profound evolution of the car. The Dyane’s name found its inspiration through the catalogue of names available with Panhard, recently purchased by the car manufacturer. Similarly to its rival, the Dyane was a hatchback, equipped with modern projectors integrated into the wings with a bi-cylinder engine derived from the model used for the other cars in the brand. Destined to replace the 2CV, the Dyane left the market before it, with its commercialisation being terminated in 1983.     Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
incl. VAT plus P&P

1:18 Citroën Dyane 6, orange, 1967

In the middle of the sixties, sales for the Citroën 2CV were starting to feel the burn from its rival, the Renault R4. The brand decided to react by producing a profound evolution of the car. The Dyane’s name found its inspiration through the catalogue of names available with Panhard, recently purchased by the car manufacturer. Similarly to its rival, the Dyane was a hatchback, equipped with modern projectors integrated into the wings with a bi-cylinder engine derived from the model used for the other cars in the brand. Destined to replace the 2CV, the Dyane left the market before it, with its commercialisation being terminated in 1983.     Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
incl. VAT plus P&P

1:18 Citroën HY "Pompiers", 1969

The HY was born in 1948. Post-war France had much need for utility vehicles to help rebuild the country and kick-start the economy. It was under the guidance of Pierre Boulanger that this vehicle appeared, with practicality, solidity and recycling existing parts being its main objectives. It would make many a tradesman happy, along with the national police force. The HY would also become the go-to car for the fire department, some still being in use today.     Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
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1:18 Citroën HY "Spar", 1969

  Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
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1:18 Citroën Traction 11CV FFI, 1944

Born on the 18th April 1934, the Citroën Traction marked history. As soon as it came into the world with its innovations – of which traction control, from which it draws its names – and in 1936, when the development cost of the sedan bankrupted the firm, and its eventual takeover by Michelin. This traction, after having been requisitioned by the German army, was captured by the French Forces of the Interior (FFI), and would serve its purpose in the liberation of Paris. Adorned with the French flag so as to avoid it being mistaken for a German target, it would remain engraved in everyone's memory thanks to the FFI letters on the side doors. It has since become emblematic of the French resistance.     Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
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1:18 Citroën Traction 11CV, beige bordeaux, 1938

The Citroën Traction came with a number of technological breakthroughs. When it came out in 1938, it abandoned the idea of propulsion that gave it front-wheel drive, its structure was monohulled, its brakes hydraulic, and its suspension was equipped with 4 independent wheels. The handling and technological advancements of the 11CV suddenly put all its competitors back in the dark ages. The Traction would enter French history, becoming first the car of choice for the Gestapo, then actively contributing to the liberation of France when it was adopted by the Resistance. Its success would remain steady until the arrival of the DS.     Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
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1:18 Fiat 500 L "Italia", 1968

As the most produced version of the Fiat 500, the L was a crock pot of everything good about Italy. With its tricoloured adhesive bands and chequered roof, it quickly became an ambassador for the dolce vita. Commercialised in the summer of 1968, and kept its original 499,5 cm³ engine with a moderate 18 horsepower. This cavalry allowed it to push up to a top speed of 95 km/h, making it perfect for countryside strolls.     Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
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1:18 Fiat 500 L "Sport", 1968

Appearing in 1968, the 500 L was the luxury variant of the Fiat 500. It was equipped with reinforced bumpers, but more importantly saw its interior revamped. The dashboard was entirely re-coated, the meters taken from the Fiat 850, the new seats were more comfortable, and the chair back could be repositioned manually. This version was a commercial success, becoming the most product model of the 500. Half its production was exported, making this car a veritable icon of Italy.     Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
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1:18 Lancia Delta Integrale 16V #1, Tour de Corse, 1991

The Lancia Delta Integrale succeeded the 4WD in 1988 to perpetuate the domination of the brand in the world rally championship. The Integrale 16V version was equipped in 1990 with the 16-valve engine from the Lancia Thema. With its over-steer and increased power, it became even more bestial with its bonnet engine being modified to integrate its new turbo. During the Tour de Corse of 1991, the Lancia Delta Integrale 16V number 1 was placed by the semi-official team Jolly Club. Placed in the hands of French pilot Didier Auriol, it took second place in the race after an intense battle with Carlos Sainz.   Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
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1:18 Mini Cooper Sport, blue, 1997

The Mini appeared in 1959, and brought with a revolution for the automobile industry. This compat model was the brain child of Sir Alec Issigonis. Sold by different brands, it would bear the markings of Austin, Morris, Wolseley, Leyland, Innocenti, before eventually finishing up with Rover. When the latter was purchased in 1994 by BMW, it continued its career until a new model was brought out inspired by the form of the original. The Cooper Sport Pack represented the ultimate evolution of the original concept, an homage to the victories in competition that were made by this iconic English car.     Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
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1:18 Mini Cooper Sport, red, 1997

The Mini appeared in 1959, and brought with a revolution for the automobile industry. This compat model was the brain child of Sir Alec Issigonis. Sold by different brands, it would bear the markings of Austin, Morris, Wolseley, Leyland, Innocenti, before eventually finishing up with Rover. When the latter was purchased in 1994 by BMW, it continued its career until a new model was brought out inspired by the form of the original. The Cooper Sport Pack represented the ultimate evolution of the original concept, an homage to the victories in competition that were made by this iconic English car.     Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
incl. VAT plus P&P

1:18 Porsche 911 2.8 RSR, grey, 1974

This Porsche 911 joined the world back in 1973, with the ambition of becoming part of the European GT championship. The objective was to beat its Ferrari rival who, with its 365 GTB Daytona was equipped with an engine twice the size of the German's. The base of the car was a 911 S that had already proven itself in rallies. The weight was reduced to a minimum, barely 840 kilos, and the engine was pushed from 2.4 to 2.7 liters. In 1973, several changes were made bringing the latter to 2.8 liters. Its horsepower was consequently brought to a total of 308, with a top speed of 280 km/h. These characteristics easily brought this car into the fold of Porsche mythology.     Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
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1:18 Porsche 911 RSR "Targa Florio", 1973

The Targa Florio is one of the oldest, most dangerous, sinewy racing circuits in the world. It has more than 1000 bends, in other words a turn every 90 metres. In 1973, Martini Racing placed their 911 RSR on the track, shedding as much weight from it as they could using fibreglass. The competition-grade pneumatics and its 2.7 litre engine pushed to 210 horsepower made mincemeat of the daunting course. The number 8 team - Muller and Van Lennep - came out on top after a tough fight, running 11 laps, a total of 792 km, with an impressive average of 114 km/h.     Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
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1:18 Porsche 911 RSR 2.8, 1974, blue

This Porsche 911 joined the world back in 1973, with the ambition of becoming part of the European GT championship. The objective was to beat its Ferrari rival who, with its 365 GTB Daytona was equipped with an engine twice the size of the German's. The base of the car was a 911 S that had already proven itself in rallies. The weight was reduced to a minimum, barely 840 kilos, and the engine was pushed from 2.4 to 2.7 liters. In 1973, several changes were made bringing the latter to 2.8 liters. Its horsepower was consequently brought to a total of 308, with a top speed of 280 km/h. These characteristics easily brought this car into the fold of Porsche mythology.     Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
incl. VAT plus P&P

1:18 Renault 4 GTL "Clan", blue, 1984

The GTL appeared in May 1986. Its mission was to renew the celebrated 4L’s image by modernising its appearance. It was equipped with protective lateral bands of grey, matching the colours of the bumpers. Its Cleon 1108 cm³ engine was able to consume only 5,4L to 100 km. As it became the GTL Clan, it adopted a new interior, with tilting seats, a digital clock and Clan inscriptions on its flank and trunk.     Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
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1:18 Renault 4L GTL, beige, 1978

The Renault 4, commonly referred to as the 4L, first appeared in 1961. It was immediately embraced by the french people, who made of this car a legend amongst its peers. With its straightforward design it became a favourite for the police, the post, families and even the Marreau brothers for the Paris Dakar. Becoming a symbol of the Seguin Island factory, it would remain in production until 1992. The Export version gave way in 1976 to the TL version. Its design was refined, and its bumpers were reinforced.     Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
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1:18 Renault R5 Turbo 1, red, 1982

The Renault 5 Turbo, the sports version of the urban Renault, was entirely rethought. Its purpose was to validate the 400 units necessary to accredit it for rally-driving. Its Cléon Fonte engine was redesigned by Alpine. With its newly-installed turbo, it could reach 160 hp, and had 1.4 liters. The positioning of the propulsion unit was changed, placing it in the middle of the rear of the car so as to distribute weight more evenly. The 5 Turbo consequently became a propulsion car and would have 1678 units produced before being replaced by the Turbo 2.     Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
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1:18 Renault R5 Turbo Gruppe B #6, Rallye De Lozere, 1984

The Renault 5 Turbo was a true legend of Group B and international rallying. With its wide wings and centrally-positioned rear engine it made for a fearsome opponent in specials. This particular version was placed by Alain Serpaggi and Yves Legal in the Lozère rally of 1984. Its 1397 cm3 engine, along with its turbo, proved Renault’s natural talent at supercharging cars. The weight of the R5 Turbo was reduced to a bare minimum of 950 kg.     Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
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1:18 Renault R5 Turbo Gruppe B, Tour De Corse, 1984

The Renault 5 Turbo was designed for the sole purpose of making this urban series shine in competition. Those terms would  be fulfilled for several years running as this radically different R5 defended its brand's reputation around the globe. In 1984 this version, piloted by the French driver Bruno Saby and co-piloted by Jean-François Faucille, started a promising rallye, but an accident on the Special 22 forced them to declare forfeit. However, the Renault 5 Turbo has for a long time now been a legend in the eyes of many.     Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
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1:18 VW Golf I, red, 1983

So as to go beyond the single car in the brand stereotype of the Beetle, Volkswagen made several gambles during the seventies. Amongst these was a new compact car presented in 1973, designed by Giorgetto Giugiaro. Its success was instantaneous, and the Golf became a landmark for compact sedan hatchbacks with its GTI version boosting the brand with its humorous advertising. This first generation of Golfs received new plastic bumpers in 1978, followed by new rear lights and an interior design, before making room for the second generation.     Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
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1:18 VW Käfer 1303 "BIG", blue, 1974

In 1974, the Beetle had made way for the Golf on the German production lines. This did not stop the brand from continuing on with its iconic model, this time with a limited Big series. The latter was marketed in England, Italy, Switzerland, Turkey and Germany. It was equipped with a unique dashboard, a sports steering wheel and a 1600 cm³ engine of 50 horsepower. The Ontario Blue livery made its way into the car with a specific upholstery with skai and corduroy.     Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
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1:18 VW Käfer 1303 police, 1974

The Beetle, referred to as the Coccinelle in France, came out in 1938. It was code-named Type 1, synonymous of the first automobile produced by Volkswagen. Designed by Ferdinand Porsche, its goal was to motorise Germany. The people's car ended up becoming the greatest success of all time in the world of cars. On the 17th February 1972, it overtook Ford T sales, and finished its career with its counter blocked at 21 529 464 units. Used by the German police for years, it is considered a symbol of peace.     Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
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1:18 VW Käfer 1303 “Racer 53”, beige

Quickly becoming an international superstar, the Volkswagen Beetle made it so far as to have a stint in the limelight. It was in the film "The Love Bug" that she ended up conquering Hollywood. In the Walt Disney film of 1968, she held the main role in the film and raced, stunted and joked her way through them. The film would lend itself to the sympathetic image of this car not quite like any other. Several other films followed, prolonging the superstar's success.     Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
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1:18 Citroen 2CV6 COCHONOU

  Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
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1:18 AC Cobra MKII 427, blue, 1965

A true American sports hero, the Cobra never ceased to adapt and evolve, always bringing with it that much more style and substance. Its design has withstood the test of time to the point that even today replicas are still being made of it!     Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
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1:18 Alpine A110 Prime Edition, blue, 2017

A dream for many over the course of decades, the return of the Alpine was finally announced in 2017 with the presentation of the Alpine A110 and its limited “First Edition” series. The latter would only be produced to the tune of 1955 units, a homage to the founding year of the brand. All of those units were pre-sold within a few days. The new generation of the Alpine A110 kept its promises by limiting its weight to 1100 kilos and a solid 252 horsepower, driven by a 4-cylinder 16-valve turbo engine. The double triangulation suspensions and reduced weight contributed to its overall agility.     Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
incl. VAT plus P&P

1:18 Alpine A110 Prime Edition, white, 2017

A dream for many over the course of decades, the return of the Alpine was finally announced in 2017 with the presentation of the Alpine A110 and its limited “First Edition” series. The latter would only be produced to the tune of 1955 units, a homage to the founding year of the brand. All of those units were pre-sold within a few days. The new generation of the Alpine A110 kept its promises by limiting its weight to 1100 kilos and a solid 252 horsepower, driven by a 4-cylinder 16-valve turbo engine. The double triangulation suspensions and reduced weight contributed to its overall agility.     Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
incl. VAT plus P&P

1:18 Bugatti Atlantic SC, black

  Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
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1:18 Bugatti Atlantic SC, blue

  Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
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1:18 Citroën DS Special, blue, 1972

When it appeared at the Paris show of 1955, the Citroën DS had the effect of a bombshell. Developed under the code name VGD (Véhicule de Grande Diffusion, Large Circulation Vehicle), it brought to the market original ideas such as its hydropneumatics suspension. A simplified version was presented following a push by Pierre Bercot, head of the company. It would be called ID in order to differentiate itself from the DS. In 1970 the ID became the special D, and let the great Citroën roll through the decades and become a legend of the industry.     Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
incl. VAT plus P&P

1:18 Fiat 131 Abarth Tour De Corse

  Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
incl. VAT plus P&P

1:18 Lancia Stratos GR4 Rallye Monte-Carlo

  Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
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1:18 Mini Cooper Sport "Union Jack", red, 1997

  Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
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1:18 Porsche 911 RSR 2.8, 1974, green

  Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
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1:18 Porsche 911 RSR BRUMOS 24H Daytona

  Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
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1:18 Renault 4L GTL Pompier Du Var

  Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
incl. VAT plus P&P

1:18 VW Golf I CL, Orange, 1974

Designed by Giorgietto Giugiaro and presented in 1973, the Golf 1 was a revolution in the automobile world. Its new look, with a multitude of angles, radically broke away from the classic Beetle that it was supposed to replace. Its success was international and, 40 years on, the VW Golf is still in the German car maker’s catalogue!     Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.
€44.95
incl. VAT plus P&P
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